Feline Font Friday 1 (in memory of Lucy)

Eleven years ago tomorrow, on September 28, I lost my beautiful sweet Lucy Cat. She was skittish and terrified when I first got her, hiding under the bed and only emerging at night to eat. I decided to take on gentling her as a project, but that soon turned into just loving her up. She eventually graduated to merely prickly, but with an increasing supply of love returned to me. I had her for 11 years and by about half that time, she had softened enough that she would play with other people, and even let them pet her. I was devastated when she died. I know, I know, everyone feels this way about their “best kitty ever,” but Lucy was mine.

On her favorite pompom “nest”

In Lucy’s honor, therefore, I have the distinct pleasure of presenting Neko Font, a DIY word creation site that takes any letters(s) you type in and converts them to kitty-shaped furriness! It was created in Japan (“neko” is the Japanese word for cat) but I have the English-language site selected; other languages are available via the menu at the top.

Continue reading “Feline Font Friday 1 (in memory of Lucy)”

F’n Huge Font Friday (Helvetica in Space)

Earth next to "h" from "helvetica"

From kottke.org:

Ben Terrett wrote a post about how many instances of the word “helvetica” set in unkerned 100 pt Helvetica it would take to go from the Earth to the Moon:

The distance to the moon is 385,000,000,000 mm. The size of an unkerned piece of normal cut Helvetica at 100pt is 136.23 mm. Therefore it would take 2,826,206,643.42 helveticas to get to the moon.

Continue reading “F’n Huge Font Friday (Helvetica in Space)”

Fourth-Dimension Font Friday

"Oxymora" font
This font will make your brain hurt

Oxymora is a typeface that evokes the twisting, non-Euclidian geometry of MC Escher’s artwork

(Birgit Palma/Cargo Collective/Inspiration Hut)

Impossible, twisting geometric artwork abounds across the internet (see The Verge‘s logo for one prominent example). So it seems high time that someone made a similarly reality-defying font. “Oxymora” is it, transforming the familiar forms of English letters into bizarre, spatially confused 3D blocks that make your brain hurt. It was created by Barcelona-based illustrator and designer Birgit Palma, who says she was inspired by the work of brain-teasing artist MC Escher. As she tells us:

Continue reading “Fourth-Dimension Font Friday”