Scientists Report First Cure of HIV in a Child, Say It’s a Game-Changer

Microscope image of HIV virus attacking cellFrom npr.org:

Scientists believe a little girl born with HIV has been cured of the infection.

She’s the first child and only the second person in the world known to have been cured since the virus touched off a global pandemic nearly 32 years ago.

Doctors aren’t releasing the child’s name, but we know she was born in Mississippi and is now 2-1/2 years old — and healthy. Scientists presented details of the case on Sunday at a scientific conference in Atlanta.

[Full article]

Cats haven’t changed much

Inky cat pawprints on 15th century manuscript

Inky cat pawprints on 15th century manuscriptFrom medievalfragments:

Everyone who has ever owned a cat will be familiar with their unmannerly feline habit of walking across your keyboard while you are typing. One of the manuscript pictures tweeted by @erik_kwakkel [link] revealed that this is nothing new.…

Cat urine on manuscriptAlthough the medieval owner of this manuscript may have been quite annoyed with these paw marks on his otherwise neat manuscript, another fifteenth-century manuscript reveals that he got off lucky.  A Deventer scribe, writing around 1420, found his manuscript ruined by a urine stain left there by a cat the night before.

[Full article]

 

 

What Computer-Powered High Frequency Trading Looks and Sounds Like

From Motherboard.com:

There was nothing very surprising about the news that the Kansas City Board of Trade will be shuttered this July, as the new owner of the 150-year-old trading floor—the central exchange for red winter wheat, used to make bread—folds it into the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. The once-raucous floor had been dead for years—traders had long since moved to desks with computer terminals.

But the announcement signaled another step into virtualization for the stock market, which has gone from being a real-life place where people shout orders at each other to bundles of high-speed wires and giant servers, a market built on speed and efficiency and ones and zeros. “The thing has come to an end,” Morgan Shay, a trader at the exchange since 1971, told Reuters. “The handwriting was on the wall when the electronic [trading] started.”

[Full article]

The best resources for learning bleeding-edge web, UI and UX design

"Finally, an awsome UX tutorial."

Great ideas for web, UI and UX design from Colm Tuite, a great authority, on Quora.com, a great site.

Here’s a pretty good resource for learning UX/UI design, if I do say so myself. There is a difference between UI design and UX design. There is a lot of overlap though, so I’ll try to bundle them together. Here it is, in ten simple steps.

#1 Discover the problem
Far too many designers sit down to work on a new project without doing any research at all. [more]

#2 Get to know your users
It’s much easier to solve problems when you first figure out who is experiencing them. Find out as much as you can about your users before you start. [more]

#3 Learn to wireframe properly
So, now that we know who our users are and what problems they are experiencing, we can start redesigning our homepage, right?

Wrong. [more]

#4 Communicate effectively
It is your job to communicate the information your users want in the quickest, most effective way possible. [more]

UX-bad Too long winded.

UX-better Better.

UX-best Bleeding edge.

#5 Guide your users
When a user lands in your app and doesn’t immediately see how it can benefit them, chances are they’re gonna leave and won’t be coming back anytime soon. [more]

#6 Encourage your users
When a user makes a mistake, don’t just inform them in a cold manner and leave them to figure out the solution. [more]

#7 Reward your users
Likewise, when your users do something right, reward them. Don’t just inform them of their success like any robot would. [more]

#8 Learn the basic fundamentals (HTML, CSS, JS, Ruby, Python etc.). [more]

#9 Learn visual design
Lots of UX designers think they don’t need to know about color or typography. Others say it’s a complete waste of time. It’s not.  [more]

#10 Study. Study. Study.
There are countless resources out there for learning about design. Here are just a few to get you started:

Resources
Smashing Magazine
Aarron Walter (aarron) on Twitter
Paul Irish (paul_irish) on Twitter
Responsive Design
Ryan Singer (rjs) on Twitter
Chris Coyier (chriscoyier) on Twitter
www.designskool.com
CSS-Tricks
AaronRobbs (AaronRobbs) on Twitter
Designing for Emotion
Welcome | Voice and Tone
Dribbble – Popular
iOS Mobile Patterns
The Main Tap › PatternTap
Google
Designer News

Awesome Sites
http://mailchimp.com
https://yourkarma.com/
http://facebook.com
http://layervault.com/


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Physicists at CERN caught ‘colliding’ household objects

Inspectors examining a recent malfunction at the Large Hadron Collider found that senior scientists had been “inserting various household objects into the collider,” causing helium leakage and misalignment of several of the magnets. The Large Hadron Collider, or LHC, cost over 4.1 billion dollars to build, runs a length of 27 kilometers below Geneva and has been used to search for evidence of the Higgs particle and the associated Higgs field. These noble goals bear little relationship to the activities engaged in by Yukihide Matsuzi, a Japanese theoretical physicist, and his colleague, Klara Eschelbach, a mathematician interested in models of supersymmetry.

“Apparently they were just chucking stuff in there to see what would happen,” said a distraught David Branston, project leader overseeing CMS and Atlas projects. “Just when we might be seeing evidence of two different Higgs particles, these clowns almost destroy the collider!” The scientists in question admitted they had already collided several watches, a fountain pen, a bunch of keys and a can of coke. “It is very irresponsible of us, but our project has been delayed by 18 months. We’ve been here doing checks and simulations for more than four years now. I guess we just couldn’t help ourselves when we realized the machine was operational but not colliding proton beams. If we found a new particle by colliding coke-cans we were going to call it a colon…” Eschelbach said in a feeble attempt to lighten the situation. “Maybe we should have stuck with our original plan of making high-energy popcorn instead…”

Branston says he’s “just glad we could stop them before it got any worse.” “Just look at the stuff they had lined up!” the project leader said. Among the objects soon to be reduced to subatomic particles were a desk chair, a Microsoft Zune and two rather nervous looking mice. The damage to the LHC will extend the two-year break by several months.

Sadly, this story appears not to be true.