Stop Building Websites and Start Building Smart Sites

Smart Site

Illustration: The Smart Site: A new medium of websiteBy Chuck Longanecker on Betterment: A blog for people who care about design:

The mission of digital-telepathy is to make great design accessible to anyone by creating new standards that improve how people interact with and create digital design. From websites to mobile apps, TVs and beyond, we’re committed to making experiences that define the future of the screen interface. Though there is plenty of ground to cover to accomplish our mission, the higher we push the standards for publishers and designers, the better the experience becomes for all web users.

We’re starting our mission with a focus on websites. Still based on print paradigms with archaic, link-driven tables of contents and page structures, today’s websites don’t capitalize on the native opportunities of the digital medium they live in. They are disjointed and kludgy, hampering the user’s ability to accomplish his or her goals. And yet, we don’t need to look any further than our handheld devices to see that user experiences don’t have to be this way. Fluid and guided, mobile apps are intuitive, providing visceral feedback that satisfies and keeps us coming back. They are the antithesis of most web experiences.

So what’s preventing the website from becoming as enjoyable and effective as mobile apps? Thanks to app-like interactions made possible by JavaScript and CSS3, faster connection speeds, and responsive design, there is no technical reason that websites can’t evolve. The only remaining barrier to a great experience is exceptional web design. Why? Because it’s historically been incredibly expensive. But if we think in terms of the experience and forget what we know about traditional web design, we can free ourselves of the expensive corporate site design time sink, and find a way to bring intuitive design to website owners everywhere.

As designers of the Web, we need to rally around a common cause of democratizing web-based experiences as seamless, story-driven, goal-based, intuitive and viscerally satisfying as their mobile brethren.

[Full article]

You’re Creating iPad Art Without Even Trying

Fingerprints from email app
Fingerprints from email app
Fingerprints from email app

By Stephanie Buck from Mashable.com:

Technology is becoming increasingly invisible. That’s impossible, you might protest — technology is more omnipotent than ever. It’s everywhere, and we can’t seem to go a day, much less an hour, without encountering it.

But entire computer systems are shrinking down to spaces the size of decks of cards. Keyboards are no longer “keys” nor “boards;” they’re touchscreens or projected lights. And screens that before constituted entire desktops have shrunk to eyeglass accessories the size of thumbtacks.

Artist Andre Woolery and partner Victor Abijaoudi want to preserve evidence that demonstrates how consumers interact with this technology. Problem is — those interactions are virtually invisible.

His latest series, titled Invisible Hieroglyphics, is a collection of fingerprints lifted off iPads. They capture how we interface with some of today’s hottest apps and social networks: where we click, how we touch and, sometimes, how fast we’re moving.

[Many more images]

Fingerprints from Fruit Ninja
Fingerprints from Fruit Ninja

 

Fingerprints from Facebook
Fingerprints from Facebook

 

Teen outfitted with first “i-limb ultra revolution” prosthetic hand, which can be controlled with an iPhone app

Patrick Kane holding a coin with his iLimb hand

16-year-old Patrick Kane was just nine months old when he fell ill with meningitis and lost part of both hands and his right leg below the knee, but he has since become the first person to be outfitted with the “i-limb ultra revolution” prosthetic hand by Touch Bionics, The Scotsman reports. The prosthetic hand can be controlled via muscle contraction or iPhone app, which can save up to 24 preset grips for certain tasks.

[Full article]

Interactive Map of the Internet App by Peer 1

Map of the internet

Map of the internetFrom laughingsquid.com:

(Click here for interactive map)

Peer 1 Hosting has created an interactive Map of the Internet app that lets users explore the internet’s infrastructure. The app displays a global view, a network view, and a chronological view that shows the evolution of the internet from 1994 to today and even predicts what the internet might look like in 2020. The Map of the Internet app is available now for iOS and Android in the iTunes App Store and Google Play.

[Full article]