Movie Monsters, Tallest Buildings in 1896, Solar System Planets and of Course Spaceships: Size Comparison Charts

Size comparison of stars

Size matters. Especially when it comes to starships, giant monsters, buildings, and . . . well, pretty much anything else that you can obsessively categorize using common measurement systems. Here are some of the most outrageously detailed size comparison charts you’ll ever see.


Spaceship Comparison Chart by Dirk Loechel

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Check the chart in full size here.

(via DeviantArt)


Star Trek ship charts, by Tim ‘Suricata’ Davies

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(One at the top of the post, and this one, via Modelclub)


Monster Movie Sizes

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(via imgur and lord-phillock)


Sandworms by Dan Meth

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(via Dan Meth)


Dinosaurs and a Pterosaur from the Late Cretaceous of Europe by Hyrotrioskjan

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From left to right:

Blasisaurus, Lirainosaueus, Hadrosaur from Bavaria, Arenysaurus, Ampelosaurus, Atsinganosaurus, Balaur, Struthiosaurus, Paludititan, Pyroraptor, Elopteryx, Magyarosaurus, Gargantuavis, Hungarosaurus, Hatzegopteryx, Ajkaceratops, Zalmoxes, Rhabdodon, Tethyshadros, Telmatosaurus

(via Hyrotrioskjan)


The Biggest Mouths in Science Fiction and Fantasy

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(via io9)


Stargate Ships by Mallacore

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(via Mallacore)


Notable High Buildings of the World, from McNally & Co.’s Universal Atlas of The World, 1896

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(via Wikimedia Commons)


Tallest Buildings in the World Now

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(via Visual.ly)


The world’s tallest buildings by 2020, from a study released by The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat

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These will be the tallest ones:

Kingdom Tower, Jeddah: 1,000+ meters (3,280+ feet)
Burj Khalifa, Dubai: 828 meters (2,717 feet)
Ping An Finance Center, Shenzen: 660 meters (2,165 feet)
Seoul Light DMC Tower: 640 meters (2,101 feet)
Signature Tower, Jakarta: 638 meters (2,093 feet)
Shanghai Tower, Shanghai: 632 meters (2,073 feet)
Wuhan Greenland Center, Wuhan: 606 meters (1,988 feet)
Makkah Royal Clock Tower Hotel, Makkah: 601 meters (1,972 feet)
Goldin Finance 117, Tian Jin: 597 meters (1,957 feet)
Lotte World Tower, Seoul: 555 meters (1,819 feet)
Doha Convention Center and Tower, Doha: 551 meters (1,808 feet)
One World Trade Center, New York City: 541 meters (1,776 feet)
Chow Tai Fook Guangzhou, Guangzhou: 530 meters (1,739 feet)
Tianjin Chow Tai Fook Binhai Center, Tian Jin: 530 meters (1,739 feet)
Dalian Greenland Center, Dalian: 518 meters (1,699 feet)
Pentominium, Dubai: 516 meters (1,693 feet)
Busan Lotte Town Tower, Busan: 510 meters (1,674 feet)
Taipei 101, Taipei: 508 meters (1,667 feet)
Kaisa Feng Long Centre, Kaisa: 500 meters (1,640 feet)
Shanghai WFC, Shanghai: 492 meters (1,614 feet)

Watch the chart in full size here (PDF).

(via Blog Construmática)


Average Floor Area per family between 1950 and 2000

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(via Treehugger)


Relative Sizes of American Amphibious Ships and Craft built since WWII

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(via LSM-275)


Space Launch Vehicles Compared to Big Ben and the Statue of Liberty

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(via Spaceanswers)


Helicopter size comparison

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(via reddit/__atomlib__)


A size comparison of four of the largest aircraft

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(via Clem Tillier/Wikimedia Commons)


Solar system planet size comparison

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(via Wikimedia Commons)


Star size comparison

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(via Quantrek)

‘Made in space!’ Astronaut sews dinosaur toy from space station scraps

Karen Nyberg dinosaur toy
NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg’s stuffed toy dinosaur floats on the International Space Station. She made the doll for her son using materials she found on the orbiting outpost. (NASA)
There is a dinosaur on board the International Space Station where there wasn’t one before.

NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg, who since May has been working as a flight engineer as a member of the orbiting outpost’s resident crew, revealed the toy dinosaur floating on the space station on September 26.

“Made in space!” Nyberg, an Expedition 37 crewmember, exclaimed in her caption for a photo of the toy giant lizard she uploaded to the pinboard-style photo-sharing website Pinterest. “I made this dinosaur for my son last Sunday, September 22.”

The dinosaur, which resembles a Tyrannosaurus Rex, has an olive green back and a lighter green belly. It is stitched together with white thread.

Nyberg, a self-described crafter whose hobbies including quilting and sewing, packed threads, sewing needles and small fabric samples for her trip to space. But to make the dinosaur, she scavenged materials that she found around her orbital home.

“It is made out of velcro-like fabric that lines the Russian food containers [that are] found here on the International Space Station,” Nyberg wrote about the doll. “It is lightly stuffed with scraps from a used t-shirt.”

Astronauts have carried stuffed dolls to space before, and cosmonauts have a tradition of launching with small plush toys as talismans and “zero-g indicators.” When the dolls, which are suspended from the Soyuz spacecraft’s control panel, begin to float, the crew can tell they have entered orbit.

Nyberg’s crew launched with a plush white dog her Soyuz commander, Fyodor Yurchikhin, had received as a gift 30 years ago and had flown into space twice before. A small black cat doll, named “Dimlar,” served as the zero-gravity indicator for the crew that arrived September 26, named after cosmonaut Oleg Kotov’s children, Dima and Lara.

Karen Nyberg sewing
Expedition 37 flight engineer Karen Nyberg devotes some of her down time creating crafts in her “sewing space.” (NASA)

 

Nyberg’s dinosaur however, may be a new breed of space toy. It may be the first stuffed animal created in space.

In addition to sewing stuffed toys for him, Nyberg keeps in daily contact with her 3-year-old son Jack, sending down short videos for him every day. Nyberg’s husband, who is also an astronaut who last flew on the final space shuttle mission in 2011, sends up photos and videos of their son.

A photo Nyberg earlier shared on Pinterest revealed that Jack has his own handiwork in space, too. Hanging on the wall of her quarters is an orange and pink painting labeled “For Mommy.”

Nyberg is slated to return to Earth on Nov. 11, presumably with the toy dinosaur in tow.