Future Font Friday 2

A gloriously obsessive examination of the typography in 2001: A Space Odyssey. This post stars Albertus, City Medium, Eurostile Bold and Bold Extended, Futura, Gill Sans, Microgramma, Spartan and Univers. Please also see my post Future Font Friday 1. Now, over to Mr. Addey:

2001: A Space Odyssey – Stanley Kubrick’s 1968 sci-fi masterpiece – seems an appropriate place to start a blog about typography in sci-fi. Amongst other delights, it offers a zero-gravity toilet, emergency resuscitations, exploding bolts, and product placement aplenty. It’s also the Ur Example of Eurostile Bold Extended’s regular appearance in spacecraft user interfaces.

Right from the opening scene, we’re treated to Kubrick’s love of bold, clean, sans-serif typography:

2001: A Space Odyssey title card

Continue reading “Future Font Friday 2”

Film Font Friday, Wes Anderson Edition

See also Film Fonts Friday 1; (Bond) Film Fonts Friday; Font Film Font Friday; and (Oscar) Film Font Friday.

Sara Enríquez  from Madrid, Spain created these whimsical typographic illustrations as an homage to film director Wes Anderson. See if you can figure out which film each letter goes with, then scroll down to check your guesses (there may be more than one letter per film). There are also links to other projects of Ms. Enríquez.

The Original “Alien” Concept Art Is Terrifying

H.R. Giger's concept art for "Alien" film

From BuzzFeed by

H.R. Giger’s original designs for Alien are even more chilling than the film.

Twentieth Century Fox / BuzzFeed

1. Legendary artist H.R. Giger died last week, aged 74.

Legendary artist H.R. Giger died last week, aged 74 .
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

2. He captured imaginations and haunted dreams with his bio-mechanical visions, drawn from his own nightmares.

He captured imaginations and haunted dreams with his bio-mechanical visions, drawn from his own nightmares.
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

3. A prolific artist for over five decades, he’s perhaps best known for his work on sci-fi classic, Alien.

A prolific artist for over fives decades, he's perhaps best known for his work on sci-fi classic, Alien .
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

4. Ridley Scott: “Giger’s designs were an especially unique experience for the audience. The world had simply never seen anything like that before.”

Ridley Scott: "Giger's designs were an especially unique experience for the audience. The world had simply never seen anything like that before."
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

5. “His work contributed significantly to the success of the film.”

"His work contributed significantly to the success of the film."
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

6. H.R Giger: “Some people would say my paintings show a future world and maybe they do, but I paint from reality.”

H.R Giger: "Some people would say my paintings show a future world and maybe they do, but I paint from reality."
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

7. “If people want to interpret my work as warnings about too much overpopulation, disease and mechanization in the future, then that is up to them.”

H.R. Giger / Titan Books

H.R. Giger / Titan Books

8. “I like to combine human beings, creatures and biomechanics.”

H.R. Giger / Titan Books

H.R. Giger / Titan Books

H.R. Giger / Titan Books

9. “And I love to work with bones—they are elemental and function and, after all, are part of human beings.”

"And I love to work with bones - they are elemental and function and, after all, are part of human beings."
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

10. “Some people say my work is often depressing and pessimistic…”

"Some people say my work is often depressing and pessimistic..."
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

11. “With the emphasis on death, blood, overcrowding, strange beings and so on, but I don’t really think it is.”

"With the emphasis on death, blood, overcrowding, strange beings and so on, but I don't really think it is."
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

12. “There is hope and a kind of beauty in there somewhere, if you look for it.”

"There is hope and a kind of beauty in there somewhere, if you look for it."
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

13.

H.R. Giger / Titan Books

14.

H.R. Giger / Titan Books

15.

H.R. Giger / Titan Books

16.

H.R. Giger / Titan Books

17.

H.R. Giger / Titan Books

18. H.R. Giger: “Dutch customs once thought my pictures were photos.”

H.R. Giger: “Dutch customs once thought my pictures were photos."
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

19. “Where on earth did they think I could have photographed my subjects? In Hell, perhaps?”

"Where on earth did they think I could have photographed my subjects? In Hell, perhaps?”
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

Images from “The Alien Archive” by Mark Salisbury, released September 5th, 2014, reposted here with permission from H.R. Giger’s estate, and Titan Books.

 

(Bond) Film Font Friday

Bond Film Titles

See also Film Font Friday 1; Film Font Friday, Wes Anderson Edition; Font Film Font Friday; and (Oscar) Film Font Friday.

50 Years Of James Bond Title Sequences Merged Into One Awesome Montage

From Dr. No to Skyfall, the title sequences of Bond movies are as much a part of film folklore as the series itself. Before the gadgets, the cars and the Bond girls step in, it’s the opening credits that set the mood for a 007 film. This video montage celebrates 50 years of these epic title sequences – a must watch for all Bond fans, movie aficionados, film students and design lovers.

Bond Film Titles

Continue reading “(Bond) Film Font Friday”

Film Fonts Friday 1

See also (Bond) Film Font Friday; Film Font Friday, Wes Anderson Edition; Font Film Font Friday; and (Oscar) Film Font Friday.

Here’s a link to a fascinating 2008 graduate thesis by Li Yu at Iowa State University: “Typography in Film Title Sequence Design.” The paper covers such topics as:

  • A Historical Look at Film Title Sequences
  • Typography Development
  • Typography on Screen
  • Methodology: Typography and Film Titles
Abstract

The present study sets off to examine the typography in film title sequence design.

Continue reading “Film Fonts Friday 1”

New Cloud Magically Appears Inside a San Francisco Room

"Nimbus Green Room"photograph

By alice from mymodernmet.com:


By now, you’re all familiar with the name Berndnaut Smilde, the Dutch artist who magically makes clouds appear inside rooms. His latest work took him to the Green Room of the Veterans Building in downtown San Francisco where he let Julia Wilczok and Maria Judice of Avant/Garde Diaries shoot him and his latest creation. The beautifully shot film, called Making Clouds, takes us behind-the-scenes with the artist where he discusses what his fascination is about clouds.

As he told Avant/Garde, “It’s not so much about the shape of the cloud but about placing it out of its natural context. It brings duality, because you can’t really grasp how to interpret the situation you are viewing. People have always had strong metaphysical connections to clouds as they symbolize the ominous.”

With hanging chandeliers and a reflection in the mirror, this latest piece, called Nimbus Green Room, is particularly enchanting. It’s almost like we’re watching a scene from a fairy tale.

[Making Clouds” (video)]

IBM Manipulates Atoms to Create the ‘World’s Smallest Movie’

Single atom and atoms in the shape of a boy

By Pete Pachal from Mashable.com:

IBM has created a short film where the actors are actually individual atoms.

A Boy and His Atom would be just like any number of unremarkable animated shorts were it not for the fact that it’s only visible if you use a microscope that enlarges the action by 100 million times. Using techniques it honed after years of researching atomic data storage, IBM created 250 stop-motion frames depicting a boy playing with his (pet? toy?) atom.

How exactly does one manipulate atoms in this way? It’s not cheap: IBM needed to use its two-ton scanning-tunnelling microscope, which operates at minus 450 degrees Fahrenheit, to shoot the film. The microscope moved a “super-sharp” needle to within 1 nanometer of a copper surface, which then could attract and physically move each atom, one by one.

[Full article]

Making the movie: