Fear Font Friday 1

Puttin’ the frighteners on ya! Here are seven classic posters—lots more at fontmeme.com.

Not to be confused with my post Fear Font Friday 2.


28 Days Later Font

28 Days Later font here refers to the font used in the poster title for the movie 28 Days Later, which is a horror zombie movie that centers on attempts of a handful of people who survived a mysterious and incurable virus across the UK to find sanctuary.

The title of 28 Days Later was designed using a grunge looking font.  A font called 28 Days Later by Jens R. Ziehn is very similar to it. The font is free to use and you can download the font for free here.


Continue reading “Fear Font Friday 1”

Funny Font Friday 1

Ratatouille movie poster

Here are five movies (of many) from fontmeme.com to make you giggle, laugh, or perhaps snort. See also my post Funny Font Friday 2, a silly alphabet book ca. 1850. 


Parks and Recreation Font

parks and recreation tv

Parks and Recreation is an American television sitcom starring Amy Poehler as Leslie Knope, a perky, mid-level bureaucrat in the parks department of Pawnee, a fictional town in Indiana. It uses the same filming style used in The Office, with the same implication of a documentary crew filming everyone.

The font used for the title of the TV show is Champion Gothic Heavyweight. Originally developed for Sports Illustrated, the Champion Gothic is a sans serif font created by Hoefler & Co. and it is inspired by the American woodtypes of the late nineteenth century. You can view more details about it on typography.com

Download Champion Gothic Font

The Champion Gothic font identified above is not available for free, please follow the link above and purchase the font. Meanwhile, you can take a look at our collection of fonts for cars, pop music and apparel as well as round-ups of new & fresh fonts around the web.

Champion Gothic Typeface in Use

In addition to Parks and Recreation, Champion Gothic typeface is also used in the following logos, movie posters or album covers etc., including: Messengers, Tourist History, Straight Outta Compton, Made in the A.M..


Ratatouille Font

Ratatouille font here refers to the font used in the poster of Ratatouille, which is a 2007 computer-animated comedy movie produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. The movie tells the story of an anthropomorphic rat named Remy who dreams of becoming a chef and tries to achieve his goal by forming an alliance with a Parisian restaurant’s garbage boy.

The movie title in the poster features a serif font with very small serifs, which is probably Copperplate Condensed Medium designed by Frederic W. Goudy and released by the American Type Founders in 1901. You can view more details about it here. For the fonts used for the Disney and Pixar logo, you can find them here and here respectively.

Download Copperplate Font

The Copperplate font identified above is not available for free, please follow the link above and purchase the font. Meanwhile, you can take a look at our collection of fonts for cars, pop music and apparel as well as round-ups of new & fresh fonts around the web.

Copperplate Typeface in Use

In addition to Ratatouille, Copperplate typeface is also used in the following logos, movie posters or album covers etc., including: King, Golden State Warriors Logo.


Louie Font

Louie font here refers to the font used in the title of Louie, which is an American comedy-drama television series that revolves around the life of Louie, a comedian and newly divorced father raising his two daughters in New York City.

The font used for the title in the promotional poster and the DVD box above is probably Mr Bubble, a comic font designed by Gaut Fonts. You can download it for free here. For the title card in the TV show, it is probably Cooper Black, a heavily weighted, old style serif typeface designed by Oswald Bruce Cooper in 1921. You can view more details about it here.

Download Cooper Black Font

The Cooper Black font identified above is not available for free, please follow the link above and purchase the font. Meanwhile, you can take a look at our collection of fonts for cars, pop music and apparel as well as round-ups of new & fresh fonts around the web.

Cooper Black Typeface in Use

In addition to Louie, Cooper Black typeface is also used in the following logos, movie posters or album covers etc., including: Gold Star Chili, Eat, Sleep, Rave, Repeat, Total Girl, Everybody Hates Chris, Burlington Coat Factory, Goblin, Roseanne, Pet Sounds, Odd Future, Key Club International, Electra Heart, EasyJet, Derek, Comfort Inn, Who is Harry Nilsson.


 

Arrested Development Font

Arrested Development font here refers to the font used in the title of Arrested Development, which is an American television sitcom originally aired on Fox for three seasons and the fourth season was released on Netflix in 2013.

The font used for the title of the TV series is probably Antique Olive Black designed by Roger Excoffon for the French type foundry Olive. More details about it can be found here.

Download Antique Olive Font

The Antique Olive font identified above is not available for free, please follow the link above and purchase the font. Meanwhile, you can take a look at our collection of fonts for cars, pop music and apparel as well as round-ups of new & fresh fonts around the web.

Antique Olive Typeface in Use

In addition to Arrested Development, Antique Olive typeface is also used in the following logos, movie posters or album covers etc., including: Goin’ in Your Direction, The Fast and the Furious, Journey to the Center of the Earth, Rebirth of a Nation, See You Again, General Mills, Fear of a Black Planet, If You Go Away, Close Encounters of the Third Kind.


 

Hangover Font

Hangover font here refers to the font used in the poster title of The Hangover, which is an American comedy film released in 2009. The story follows that three guys travel to Las Vegas for a bachelor party to celebrate their friend’s coming marriage but they end up having to find their friend before the wedding after they waken up from drunkenness.

The font used for the poster title lettering of the film is very similar to Futura Medium, which is a commercial font and it is available for purchase here.

Download Futura Font

The Futura font identified above is not available for free, please follow the link above and purchase the font. Meanwhile, you can take a look at our collection of fonts for cars, pop music and apparel as well as round-ups of new & fresh fonts around the web.

Futura Typeface in Use

In addition to Hangover, Futura typeface is also used in the following logos, movie posters or album covers etc., including: Beautiful Creatures, People Like Us, Maroon 5, Liv and Maddie (TV Show), Destiny, Supreme, 2001 A Space Odyssey, Forza Horizon, V for Vendetta, The Guilt Trip, Lemme Freak, Chicago, Warframe, Just Do It, Gravity.

“Hanging by a serif” by John D. Berry

"Hanging By A Serif" book cover

A big shoutout to my friend John D. Berry, whose book Hanging by a serif has just been released. Click on the pages for a closer look.
John D. Berry - Hanging by a serif - front   John D. Berry - Hanging by a serif - card-15   John D. Berry - Hanging by a serif - spread

Hanging by a serif

A few words about designing with words

Text & design by John D. Berry

A small book of epigrams, insights on the nature and practice of typography and design, Hanging by a serif presents each statement on its own page, the text juxtaposed with a single graphic element: an enlarged detail of a serif, each one from a different typeface. The playful presentation belies the underlying seriousness and usefulness of the advice.

Hanging by a serif is available in two forms: as a booklet, where the epigrams are composed in double-page spreads; and as a set of cards, with each epigram on its own separate card. The booklets are saddle-stitched and printed on Cougar Opaque; the cards are printed on a heavy, textured card stock and bound together with a paper belly band (a “book obi”) that can be removed. Both are digitally printed, with a trim size of 4.75″×7″.

Hanging by a serif — Booklet

$12.00 + $2.50 shipping

Hanging by a serif — Set of cards

$25.00 + $2.50 shipping

Copyright © 2007–2013 by John D. Berry

Extreme Typographic Nerdery, Part 2: Making Sense of Type Classification

Collage of names of classifications of type

By from SmashingMagazine.com:

In the first installment of this two-part series on type classification, we covered the basics of type classification — the various methods people have used, why they are helpful, and a brief survey of type history, classifying and identifying typefaces along the way. Unfortunately, we only got as far as Roman (traditional serif) typefaces and the early-19th century. Now we’re back for part 2!

Part 2 will primarily cover sans typefaces, with a nod to display typefaces and other less common categories, as well as address a few of the questions people have about whether type classification is helpful and necessary.

If you haven’t read part 1, now’s your chance to go over it. It lays important groundwork for this article, covers the categories of serif typefaces, and contains plenty of useful information about the development of serif type. If you already have read it, here is a quick recap to get us started before we move on to the new material.

type classification

Review

Type Classification Systems

Type has been classified in many ways over the years, both formal and informal — Thibaudeau, Vox, British Standards, etc. None of these are complete or all-encompassing, but they’re helpful as an aid to study as well as for learning to use type correctly and effectively. The material in this two-part series draws heavily from the Vox-ATypI system, which is the most “official” of the systems today, having been adopted by the Association Typographique Internationale in 1962 and still the most commonly referenced system.

Is it perfect? No, but it provides a good overview of what is out there; and when you describe typefaces using the terms you’ll learn in this series, anyone who is reasonably familiar with typography will know what you’re talking about.

Here is a quick overview of the type categories we covered in part 1.

Humanist/Venetian

Venetian Typeface Characteristics

  • Notable calligraphic influence, patterned after handwriting.
  • Strongly angled axis or stress.
  • Based on typefaces designed in Renaissance cultural hubs such as Venice.

Garalde

Oldstyle Typeface Characteristics

  • Less calligraphic influence because type began to be viewed as separate from writing.
  • Named after influential type designers Claude Garamont and Aldus Manutius.
  • Still has a tilted axis but less obvious than in Humanist type.

Transitional/Neoclassical

Transitional Characteristics

  • No calligraphic influence. Designed independently, sometimes on a grid.
  • First appeared in the late-17th century.
  • Virtually vertical axis and high contrast between heavy and thin strokes.

Didone

Didone Characteristics

  • Extreme contrast between thick and thin. Rigidly vertical axis.
  • Abrupt, or unbracketed, serifs. Very precisely designed.
  • Named after Firmin Didot and Giambattista Bodoni.

Slab Serif

Slab Serif Characteristics

  • Very heavy weight and low contrast between thick and thin.
  • Unbracketed, prominent serifs.
  • First typefaces created expressly for display purposes.

[Full article]

Extreme Typographic Nerdery, Part 1: Making Sense of Type Classification

Collage of names of classifications of type

By from SmashingMagazine.com:

In my previous article on Smashing Magazine (“Understanding the Difference Between Typography and Lettering”), I wrote about how understanding type terminology can help us better appreciate the arts of typography and lettering. This article again deals with terminology, probably more specifically than most designers are used to, and the title gets to the heart of what I’m communicating in this article.

Everyone knows their serifs and sans, slabs and scripts, but most classifications go much deeper than that. Type classification, while helpful, is often convoluted, confusing and even controversial. This article, distilling some of the complexities into a more understandable format, lands somewhere in the middle between the basics and genuine type nerdery — the perfect level for a practicing designer.

Making Sense of Type Classification

Why Classify Type?

There’s a certain intellectual delight in knowledge, particularly knowledge about one’s field of work and study. More importantly, perhaps, there is a way in which seemingly impractical knowledge of one’s profession lends more credence to the designer. That being said, what you’ll read here is by no means impractical. It really comes down to solid design choices.

Artist-14-opt
Sets film in 1920′s uses typeface from 1975.

A good grasp of type history will help you avoid typographic anachronisms, which, although often lost on the general public, do not escape the notice of many designers, as demonstrated in Mark Simonson’s article on the 2012 Oscar winner for Best Picture, “The Artist,” and his other typographic scrutinies of popular movies and media.

It’s not exclusively about the history of type, however. Type classification is also helpful in pairing typefaces for projects, sometimes based on historical proximity but also by noting similar features that unify the typefaces, such as axis or x-height. In some cases, by finding enough disparity in the small features, very different typefaces become complementary.

Most importantly, perhaps, this article will not only familiarize you with general type history and commonly used terminology, but also help you learn to look for and recognize important characteristics of type and the inexhaustible minutiae that make typefaces unique, as well as arm you with useful descriptors of type styles.

Type Classification Systems

Over the past century, quite a few classification systems have been proposed. Most are generally believed to be subjective and incomplete, and many of them use the same terms for similar but slightly different classes. The impossibility of a truly complete classification system has led many people to dismiss any attempt to classify typefaces — there are simply too many variables to make anything close to a practical, comprehensive system. Essentially, classification describes typefaces; it does not define them. It’s not inflexible, and is more of an aid than a rule. However, for the reasons given above, I believe there is value to be found in it. Below are a few examples.

The primary “official” classification system currently is the Vox-ATypI system. Originally put together in 1954 by Maxmilien Vox, it was adopted in 1962 by the Association Typographique Internationale (ATypI), which made a minor change at the 2010 conference (appropriately, held in Dublin) to include Gaelic as an extra category. It classifies typefaces in 11 general categories, with some subdivision. Its Wikipedia article provides an excellent overview.

The British Standards Classification of Typefaces, adopted in 1967, is also based on Vox’s original classification. It is slightly simplified and has remained essentially unchanged since its adoption.

Bringhurst, in his Elements of Typographic Style — perhaps the standard in typographic textbooks today — categorizes typefaces loosely after periods of art history; for example, Baroque, Rococo, Romantic, etc. A book designer himself, Bringhurst focuses on text typefaces and practically ignores display type.

Others are much more general. An early system by French typographer Francis Thibaudeau, which provided the base for Vox’s later more thorough classification, includes four broad categories: Antiques (sans serifs), Égyptiennes (slab serifs), Didots and Elzévirs (faces with triangular serifs).

Gerrit Noordzij, while at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in the Hague, held that typography was essentially an extension of handwriting, teaching typography using loose categories of letters that might be written with a broad-nib or pointed-nib pen, as well as interrupted or uninterrupted strokes, with varieties of both serifs and sans falling into each category.

These are just a few of the ways people have classified type over the years. In this two-part article, I will condense the various methods slightly and present what is at the very least generally accepted as legitimate (as there will always be a few out there who refuse to give up a particularly unusual classification method, or who decry any method at all).

[Full article]