The Original “Alien” Concept Art Is Terrifying

H.R. Giger's concept art for "Alien" film

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H.R. Giger’s original designs for Alien are even more chilling than the film.

Twentieth Century Fox / BuzzFeed

1. Legendary artist H.R. Giger died last week, aged 74.

Legendary artist H.R. Giger died last week, aged 74 .
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

2. He captured imaginations and haunted dreams with his bio-mechanical visions, drawn from his own nightmares.

He captured imaginations and haunted dreams with his bio-mechanical visions, drawn from his own nightmares.
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

3. A prolific artist for over five decades, he’s perhaps best known for his work on sci-fi classic, Alien.

A prolific artist for over fives decades, he's perhaps best known for his work on sci-fi classic, Alien .
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

4. Ridley Scott: “Giger’s designs were an especially unique experience for the audience. The world had simply never seen anything like that before.”

Ridley Scott: "Giger's designs were an especially unique experience for the audience. The world had simply never seen anything like that before."
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

5. “His work contributed significantly to the success of the film.”

"His work contributed significantly to the success of the film."
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

6. H.R Giger: “Some people would say my paintings show a future world and maybe they do, but I paint from reality.”

H.R Giger: "Some people would say my paintings show a future world and maybe they do, but I paint from reality."
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

7. “If people want to interpret my work as warnings about too much overpopulation, disease and mechanization in the future, then that is up to them.”

H.R. Giger / Titan Books

H.R. Giger / Titan Books

8. “I like to combine human beings, creatures and biomechanics.”

H.R. Giger / Titan Books

H.R. Giger / Titan Books

H.R. Giger / Titan Books

9. “And I love to work with bones—they are elemental and function and, after all, are part of human beings.”

"And I love to work with bones - they are elemental and function and, after all, are part of human beings."
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

10. “Some people say my work is often depressing and pessimistic…”

"Some people say my work is often depressing and pessimistic..."
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

11. “With the emphasis on death, blood, overcrowding, strange beings and so on, but I don’t really think it is.”

"With the emphasis on death, blood, overcrowding, strange beings and so on, but I don't really think it is."
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

12. “There is hope and a kind of beauty in there somewhere, if you look for it.”

"There is hope and a kind of beauty in there somewhere, if you look for it."
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

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H.R. Giger / Titan Books

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H.R. Giger / Titan Books

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H.R. Giger / Titan Books

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H.R. Giger / Titan Books

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H.R. Giger / Titan Books

18. H.R. Giger: “Dutch customs once thought my pictures were photos.”

H.R. Giger: “Dutch customs once thought my pictures were photos."
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

19. “Where on earth did they think I could have photographed my subjects? In Hell, perhaps?”

"Where on earth did they think I could have photographed my subjects? In Hell, perhaps?”
H.R. Giger / Titan Books

Images from “The Alien Archive” by Mark Salisbury, released September 5th, 2014, reposted here with permission from H.R. Giger’s estate, and Titan Books.

 

Incredible paintings of sci-fi suburbia will make you wish you were Swedish

Simon Stalenhag painting

By Dante D’Orazio from theverge.com:

Gallery Photo:

Welcome to rural Sweden, sometime in the late ’80s. Citizens go about their mundane lives and children explore the countryside. But something isn’t quite right. Robots and hovercrafts are commonplace, and decaying science facilities sprout from the harsh Scandinavian landscape. There’s even a rumor circulating that dinosaurs have returned from the dead after some failed experiment.

This is the world that exists in artist Simon Stålenhag’s mind, and it’s only accessible through his paintings. The alternate universe he’s created is inspired by the sci-fi movies he watched as a kid growing up in the rural areas around Stockholm. As he explains to The Verge, “The only difference in the world of my art and our world is that … ever since the early 20th century, attitudes and budgets were much more in favor of science and technology.” So boxy Volvos, Volkswagens, and Mercedes share the landscape with robots. But science has lost some of its luster. In Sweden, a massive government science facility (equipped with an underground particle collider, of course) is long past its glory days in the field of “experimental physics.” Despite developments in robotics and “anti-grav” technology, the difficulties of the modern human experience haven’t changed.

The artwork is impactful as a result of this juxtaposition between the harsh realities of life and the sci-fi technologies of our dreams. It’s reminiscent of worlds like the one so effectively portrayed in games like Half-Life 2, and like such great video games, the universe created by the artist seems to continue beyond the edge of the canvas.

Simon Stålenhag used a Wacom tablet and pen to digitally paint the works below. More of his work, including prints and shots of some of the paintings below in detail, are at his website. All images used with permission, and copyright Simon Stålenhag.