Foreign Font Friday 2

New York "N"

Here’s a beautiful font inspired by the designers’ love of travel. Photographic images of destinations paired with a strong sans serif typeface create a unique and memorable look. See also Foreign Font Friday 1, about typefaces that have a foreign look.

Around the World With Type by Rigved Sathe and Payal Jagwani

We intend to take you on a journey into the exciting world of graphic design, enchanted by some of the most beautiful destinations. Our thirst for travel had us going crazy with colors, images, letterforms and exploring the depths of experimental type. We present to you “Around the World With Type”, a shout out to all the beautiful places and people out there!

Found Font Friday

Doves type letter "e"

With regard to the surreptitious disposal and triumphant recovery of the Doves Type from London’s Thames River (from an article in typespec magazine): The Doves Type® revival . Not to be confused with my post Found Font Friday 2, about fonts created from lettering and signs found in the great outdoors.

Raised from the dead: The Doves Type story. 

The Doves Type legend is one of the most enduring in typographic history and probably the most infamous. It’s the story of a typeface and a bitter feud between the two partners of Hammersmith’s celebrated Doves Press, Thomas James Cobden-Sanderson and Emery Walker, leading to the protracted disposal of their unique metal type into London’s River Thames. Starting in 1913 with the initial dumping of the punches and matrices, by the end of January 1917 an increasingly frail Cobden-Sanderson had made hundreds of clandestine trips under cover of darkness to Hammersmith Bridge and systematically thrown 12lb parcels of metal type into the murky depths below. As one person so aptly commented on Twitter recently, this notorious tale bears all the hallmarks of a story by Edgar Allan Poe.

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14,000+ color names! Just type in a hex code

Smashing Magazine‘s Smashing Newsletter Issue #190 has this gem: more than 14,000 color names, accessible by entering a 6-digit hex code. Some examples below. Click on “quick! Find one of 14’000 color names!” to get the HTML, CSS, and JS code (see below).

What comes to your mind when you hear terms like “Bright Nori”, “Paw Print” or “Waffle Cone”? If you’re thinking of colors, well, good guess! Actually, these are only three of the 14,874 unique color names in the massive color dictionary that David Aerne brought to life. 

Color Names

The aim of the project is to create as large a list as possible of unique color names. And, well with almost 15,000 color names featured, the undertaking definitely was successful. The names are merged from various sources and handpicked from thousands of user submissions. You can enter a hex value to find the name for it, indulge in the entire list, or, if you’re feeling creative, submit your own color name. Color inspiration at its finest.

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Fans Font Friday – Art Deco

Here are some beautiful hand fans from the Art Deco era.


Vintage Advertising Hand Fan – 666 Brand Salve

A common use of imagery on hand fans seems to have been informational rather than just decoration. This one is for “666” brand remedy for everything from malaria to neuralgia. The stylized illustration of Diana is in the traditional depiction of the ancient world of gods and goddesses. The handle of the front of the fan uses a classically Art Deco all-caps font, with its low crossbars on the “E,” stylized “S,” and geometrically circular “O” and “Q.”

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Fairbanks, Flagstaff, Fresno, Florida, Fairfield, Falmouth, Fayette, Fargo, Fort Worth Font Friday

Andy Murdock is co-founder of The Statesider: “The most interesting US travel stories, delivered directly to your inbox.” Here he writes about the 222 fonts he found with names associated with US states.


The United Fonts of America

Before 1984, I had never encountered the word “font.” Then a Macintosh computer showed up in my house.

A beige block with a too-small black and white screen and a thingy called a “mouse,” the first thing I saw when I turned it on was “Welcome to Macintosh” in what I would soon learn was a font called Chicago. Both the smily Mac and the Chicago font that greeted anyone booting up a Mac in the mid ’80s were designed by Susan Kare, and they both captured the friendly, accessible new era of computing that made the Mac so revolutionary.

There wasn’t much to do on it right away. I got a text adventure game version of the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy because a clerk at Egghead Software dropped a shelf on my mom’s head and gave it to her as a “please don’t sue us” gift. Otherwise, I had MacPaint and MacWrite where I could draw and type whatever I could think of, and there was a menu of fonts to choose from — not just Chicago, but a list of fonts named for world cities. Monaco, London, San Francisco, Cairo. Words weren’t just words, they could be design, history, geography.

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F*cking Font Friday

Scunthorpe Sans, according to its promo material at Vole.wtf, is “[a] s*** font that f***ing censors bad language automatically.” The Vole.wtf page has a font generator, where you can input the foul words of your choice and see the censorship in real time (scroll down for an example of what it looks like). Indulge your inner 12-year-old for some silly f***ing fun and go try it!

[Scunthorpe Sans is] able to detect the words f***,  s***,  p***, t***,  w***, c*** and dozens more, but with a special exemption for “Scunthorpe”; that town has suffered enough.

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Family vs Variable Font Friday

The fearsome Hydra provides a handy illustration of current vs. future trends in digital typography.

  • Current: typeface “families” with a different cut for each style: e.g. 8 pt/12 pt/ 18 pt, thin/regular/bold, condensed/regular/expanded, etc., and combinations thereof. (“Cut” refers to the metal type of yore, in which the master for each style was literally cut differently out of metal.) Each style is contained in a separate file.
  • Different cuts are/were important to customize each version of a typeface to maximize its legibility and readability at any given size/style. (E.g. more space on either side of letters at small sizes so the eye can differentiate between them more easily.)
  • Future: typefaces that are designed so that a single master style dynamically (mathematically) alters itself to suit the designer’s need. All styles are contained in a single file, smaller than the many files of the family versions. 

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