Foreign Font Friday 2

New York "N"

Here’s a beautiful font inspired by the designers’ love of travel. Photographic images of destinations paired with a strong sans serif typeface create a unique and memorable look. See also Foreign Font Friday 1, about typefaces that have a foreign look.

Around the World With Type by Rigved Sathe and Payal Jagwani

We intend to take you on a journey into the exciting world of graphic design, enchanted by some of the most beautiful destinations. Our thirst for travel had us going crazy with colors, images, letterforms and exploring the depths of experimental type. We present to you “Around the World With Type”, a shout out to all the beautiful places and people out there!

Found Font Friday

Doves type letter "e"

With regard to the surreptitious disposal and triumphant recovery of the Doves Type from London’s Thames River (from an article in typespec magazine): The Doves Type® revival . Not to be confused with my post Found Font Friday 2, about fonts created from lettering and signs found in the great outdoors.

Raised from the dead: The Doves Type story. 

The Doves Type legend is one of the most enduring in typographic history and probably the most infamous. It’s the story of a typeface and a bitter feud between the two partners of Hammersmith’s celebrated Doves Press, Thomas James Cobden-Sanderson and Emery Walker, leading to the protracted disposal of their unique metal type into London’s River Thames. Starting in 1913 with the initial dumping of the punches and matrices, by the end of January 1917 an increasingly frail Cobden-Sanderson had made hundreds of clandestine trips under cover of darkness to Hammersmith Bridge and systematically thrown 12lb parcels of metal type into the murky depths below. As one person so aptly commented on Twitter recently, this notorious tale bears all the hallmarks of a story by Edgar Allan Poe.

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Fans Font Friday – Art Deco

Here are some beautiful hand fans from the Art Deco era.


Vintage Advertising Hand Fan – 666 Brand Salve

A common use of imagery on hand fans seems to have been informational rather than just decoration. This one is for “666” brand remedy for everything from malaria to neuralgia. The stylized illustration of Diana is in the traditional depiction of the ancient world of gods and goddesses. The handle of the front of the fan uses a classically Art Deco all-caps font, with its low crossbars on the “E,” stylized “S,” and geometrically circular “O” and “Q.”

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Fonting while Queer Font Friday

In-person LGBTQIA+ celebrations may be cancelled this year, but a new(ish) typeface can soothe your wounds with rainbow colored strokes. Behold: the typeface “Gilbert.”

[Update] I’m getting some formatting errors in this post, so here’s a link to the original article: https://www.typewithpride.com/


On 31 March, 2017, Gilbert Baker the creator of the iconic Rainbow Flag sadly passed away. Mr. Baker was both an LGBTQ activist and artist, and was known for helping friends create banners for protests and marches. To honor the memory of Gilbert Baker,  NewFest and NYC Pride partnered with Fontself to create a free font inspired by the design language of the iconic Rainbow Flag, the font was named ‘Gilbert’ after Mr. Baker. A preview version of the font can be downloaded for free in the download section.

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Fans Font Friday 1 – Flirtations

Apart from the small matter of the horrifying death and illness we see around us and in the media, by now we are all heartily *tired* of this pandemic. Whether we are stuck at home, stuck working, stuck taking on new household/schooling responsibilities, any combination thereof or—I hope not—stuck in bed with *any* ailment, a diversion is necessary.

Behold: April is fan month!

For the next three weeks, I’ll be bringing you font-related posts about hand fans: the old, the new, the folding, the fixed, the genteel, the rude. Today’s post is about the Victorian language of flirtation using fans (and other items).

Ways to tell the coronavirus: “I wish to get rid of you.”

  • Twirling a fan in one’s left hand or, alternately, placing it to one’s left ear
  • Biting the tips of one’s gloves
  • Twirling one’s handkerchief in the left hand
  • Carrying one’s hat in the left hand
  • Folding up one’s parasol
  • Placing one’s stamp in the left corner of one’s envelope

As a left-handed person, I am buoyed by these acknowledgements of the power of the sinister (see what I did there?).

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