Fonting while Queer Font Friday

In-person LGBTQIA+ celebrations may be cancelled this year, but a new(ish) typeface can soothe your wounds with rainbow colored strokes. Behold: the typeface “Gilbert.”

[Update] I’m getting some formatting errors in this post, so here’s a link to the original article: https://www.typewithpride.com/


On 31 March, 2017, Gilbert Baker the creator of the iconic Rainbow Flag sadly passed away. Mr. Baker was both an LGBTQ activist and artist, and was known for helping friends create banners for protests and marches. To honor the memory of Gilbert Baker,  NewFest and NYC Pride partnered with Fontself to create a free font inspired by the design language of the iconic Rainbow Flag, the font was named ‘Gilbert’ after Mr. Baker. A preview version of the font can be downloaded for free in the download section.

Continue reading “Fonting while Queer Font Friday”

Fans Font Friday 2 – Art Deco

Here are some beautiful hand fans from the Art Deco era.


Vintage Advertising Hand Fan – 666 Brand Salve

A common use of imagery on hand fans seems to have been informational rather than just decoration. This one is for “666” brand remedy for everything from malaria to neuralgia. The stylized illustration of Diana is in the traditional depiction of the ancient world of gods and goddesses. The handle of the front of the fan uses a classically Art Deco all-caps font, with its low crossbars on the “E,” stylized “S,” and geometrically circular “O” and “Q.”

Continue reading “Fans Font Friday 2 – Art Deco”

Fans Font Friday 1 – Flirtations

Apart from the small matter of the horrifying death and illness we see around us and in the media, by now we are all heartily *tired* of this pandemic. Whether we are stuck at home, stuck working, stuck taking on new household/schooling responsibilities, any combination thereof or—I hope not—stuck in bed with *any* ailment, a diversion is necessary.

Behold: April is fan month!

For the next three weeks, I’ll be bringing you font-related posts about hand fans: the old, the new, the folding, the fixed, the genteel, the rude. Today’s post is about the Victorian language of flirtation using fans (and other items).

Ways to tell the coronavirus: “I wish to get rid of you.”

  • Twirling a fan in one’s left hand or, alternately, placing it to one’s left ear
  • Biting the tips of one’s gloves
  • Twirling one’s handkerchief in the left hand
  • Carrying one’s hat in the left hand
  • Folding up one’s parasol
  • Placing one’s stamp in the left corner of one’s envelope

As a left-handed person, I am buoyed by these acknowledgements of the power of the sinister (see what I did there?).

Continue reading “Fans Font Friday 1 – Flirtations”

(Rainbow) Flag Font Friday

In-person LGBTQIA+ celebrations may be cancelled this year, but a new(ish) typeface can soothe your wounds with rainbow colored curves and strokes. Behold: the typeface “Gilbert.”

[Update] I’m getting some formatting errors in this post, so here’s a link to the original article: https://www.typewithpride.com/


On 31 March, 2017, Gilbert Baker, the creator of the iconic Rainbow Flag, sadly passed away. Mr. Baker was both an LGBTQ activist and artist, and was known for helping friends create banners for protests and marches. To honor the memory of Gilbert Baker, NewFest and NYC Pride partnered with Fontself to create a free font inspired by the design language of the iconic Rainbow Flag, the font was named ‘Gilbert’ after Mr. Baker. A preview version of the font can be downloaded for free in the download section.

(Videos, animations and lots more type specimens at https://www.typewithpride.com/.)

Continue reading “(Rainbow) Flag Font Friday”

Fonting While Female Font Friday

Golly gosh, folks, this Sunday, March 8 is International Women’s Day! Isn’t it neat that they let us ladies have a whole day to ourselves? And a whole month to ourselves too? One out of twelve is just nifty! In any case, I thought I’d celebrate the day’s novel status with some typography for this, my cute li’l typography blog, and look for women-oriented fonts.

Skip to here for the #resistance.

Here’s the very first thing I got when I googled “female” and “font” on March 8 last year:

Continue reading “Fonting While Female Font Friday”

Festive Font Friday (Weekend Solstice Edition)

Not to be confused with my post Festive Fonts (For You) Friday.

Sunday, December 22 at 04:19 Universal Time is this year’s winter or summer solstice! (Former: Northern Hemisphere; latter: Southern Hemisphere.) UT is 8 hours ahead of Pacific Time, so for here in San Francisco the solstice is Saturday, December 21 at 8:19 pm.

Next: science! Wait, don’t run away, this is cool. Due to the tilt of Earth’s axis while we orbit our beloved Sun, we have seasons: periods of greater or lesser daylight and warmth. Combined with other atmospheric phenomena, we have rain, snow, dryness, wind. All the stuff! Yay tilt!

The word solstice is derived from the Latin sol (“sun”) and sistere (“to stand still”), because at the solstices, the Sun’s declination appears to “stand still”; that is, the seasonal movement of the Sun’s daily path (as seen from Earth) stops at a northern or southern limit before reversing direction.

Below are an orbit diagram and a solstice closeup, for the more visually oriented of us. Scroll to the very bottom for a chart with exact times.

And because I am me, I’ve curated for you three very different typefaces called “Solstice”—or in one case, “Solstice of Suffering.” If anyone can explain that name to me, please feel free. Peak suffering, after which the suffering wanes, only to be reborn again in six months? It all seems a bit dubious. In any case, scroll partway down for those.


Diagram of the Earth’s seasons as seen from the north. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solstice

Continue reading “Festive Font Friday (Weekend Solstice Edition)”

First Americans Font Thursday: Thanksgiving Edition

In the U.S., today is Thanksgiving, billed as a day of giving thanks for our blessings, in commemoration of the story of the Pilgrims and the Wampanoag Indians feasting together. (You’re supposed to do it with your birth family, unless you’re too queer or trans or many other marginalized groups, of course. Or too political. So many of us spend the day with chosen family if we can. )

For many Native American people, however, today is the Day of Mourning, marking a characteristic and systemic way in which the shameful history of colonization and genocide by Europeans of Native Americans has been elided and erased. Find out whose land you stand on. See here and here for starters, and beautiful image results from a Google search on “Native American script.”